Close
Do you have a question?

Contact us

Thank you, your request has been sent!
Ooops, something happened during filling!
Contact
Free Demo
Saint-Gobain

How can we raise awareness on the subject of noise in the city, thanks to the surrounding sound data?

Design

The aim was to symbolize the absorption of these sounds by Saint-Gobain materials. It was therefore necessary to imagine a visual representation that expresses the insertion of this sound within this material. This was materialized by an invisible "sound ball" that hits the image wall, before generating a wave, as if it were integrated into Saint-Gobain's materials... Before disappearing.

Two types of data are represented:

- The multitude of little sounds that punctuate our daily life below 60 decibels

- Point sounds generated by sound events of more than 60 decibels


The premiere was seen by several thousand people on the Place Stravinsky (Paris) for two days.

Concept

Creative journey - The challenge of representing noisy and surrounding sound data

In order to represent the notions of noise in the city, we evaluated several ways of looking at it graphically.

Contrary to classical sound representations (lyrics, music), the type of sound to represent here was challenging for several reasons:

  1. The representation of ambient sound: this multitude of small sounds represents a mental burden for everyone. But how to represent this multiplicity?
  2. The representation of particularly striking sound events: in the city, at regular intervals, particularly noisy sound events (more than 70.80 decibels) occur: whether it is a very noisy scooter, construction work, the passage of a truck, horns... These sound events must be able to cohabit on the same representation in a logical way.
  3. Representing the notion of sound capture by Saint-Gobain: not only is it useful and necessary to represent sound, but this project also needed to image the fact that Saint-Gobain materials absorb sound and offer soundproofed habitats.

We invite you to discover the different creative stages that led to the one that the public was able to discover on the Place Stravinsky in Paris. 

First iteration: sound as a flow

Our first iterations proposed the idea of a protective dome of different "sound flows" that come crashing down. Although this proposal had the benefit of offering protection by Saint-Gobain materials, it seemed a bit dry visually.

Second iteration: sound rain

Further research into sound revealed how the ambient sound of Stravinsky Square was very atomized, with many small sounds. So we thought it was interesting to use the metaphor of rain to represent these sounds.

Third iteration: ripple effect 

To show the trace left by sound on our mind, we also considered working on effects that work with an effect (cause) and a visual consequence representation. Spoiler: this is the track we chose to work on for the rest of the project.


Fourth iteration: sound waves

Before producing our latest version we wanted to evaluate the potential of a wave performance: the advantage of this kind of design is that it is very sensitive to subtle sound variations. The disadvantage is that it communicates too little of the absorption of materials. We therefore left this representation aside.

Fifth iteration: organic grid

We took up the same idea but made it the most sober. Thus a grid of dots is a metaphor for the protection provided by Saint-Gobain materials: always present, but without us necessarily being aware of it. When a sound appears, a sound wave appears and absorbs the sound within the Saint-Gobain materials, until it disappears.

A geolocalized sound

6 microphones were deployed on each side of the house. They expose the sound all around, so that the events are represented according to their longitudinal location.

The microphones used are H2n from the Japanese brand Zoom. 

Final representation

For the final representation, we used the Unity tool. In order to represent the sounds on each part of the creation, we had to map the sound input on each scene.


Project Details

Data Created:

Friday, November 15, 2019

Client:

Saint-Gobain

Bright represented the absorption of sound by Saint-Gobain materials as a creation that evolves in real time.

The aim was to symbolize the absorption of these sounds by Saint-Gobain materials. It was therefore necessary to imagine a visual representation that expresses the insertion of this sound within this material. This was materialized by an invisible "sound ball" that hits the image wall, before generating a wave, as if it were integrated into Saint-Gobain's materials... Before disappearing.

Two types of data are represented:

- The multitude of little sounds that punctuate our daily life below 60 decibels

- Point sounds generated by sound events of more than 60 decibels


The premiere was seen by several thousand people on the Place Stravinsky (Paris) for two days.

Creative journey - The challenge of representing noisy and surrounding sound data

In order to represent the notions of noise in the city, we evaluated several ways of looking at it graphically.

Contrary to classical sound representations (lyrics, music), the type of sound to represent here was challenging for several reasons:

  1. The representation of ambient sound: this multitude of small sounds represents a mental burden for everyone. But how to represent this multiplicity?
  2. The representation of particularly striking sound events: in the city, at regular intervals, particularly noisy sound events (more than 70.80 decibels) occur: whether it is a very noisy scooter, construction work, the passage of a truck, horns... These sound events must be able to cohabit on the same representation in a logical way.
  3. Representing the notion of sound capture by Saint-Gobain: not only is it useful and necessary to represent sound, but this project also needed to image the fact that Saint-Gobain materials absorb sound and offer soundproofed habitats.

We invite you to discover the different creative stages that led to the one that the public was able to discover on the Place Stravinsky in Paris. 

First iteration: sound as a flow

Our first iterations proposed the idea of a protective dome of different "sound flows" that come crashing down. Although this proposal had the benefit of offering protection by Saint-Gobain materials, it seemed a bit dry visually.

Second iteration: sound rain

Further research into sound revealed how the ambient sound of Stravinsky Square was very atomized, with many small sounds. So we thought it was interesting to use the metaphor of rain to represent these sounds.

Third iteration: ripple effect 

To show the trace left by sound on our mind, we also considered working on effects that work with an effect (cause) and a visual consequence representation. Spoiler: this is the track we chose to work on for the rest of the project.


Fourth iteration: sound waves

Before producing our latest version we wanted to evaluate the potential of a wave performance: the advantage of this kind of design is that it is very sensitive to subtle sound variations. The disadvantage is that it communicates too little of the absorption of materials. We therefore left this representation aside.

Fifth iteration: organic grid

We took up the same idea but made it the most sober. Thus a grid of dots is a metaphor for the protection provided by Saint-Gobain materials: always present, but without us necessarily being aware of it. When a sound appears, a sound wave appears and absorbs the sound within the Saint-Gobain materials, until it disappears.

A geolocalized sound

6 microphones were deployed on each side of the house. They expose the sound all around, so that the events are represented according to their longitudinal location.

The microphones used are H2n from the Japanese brand Zoom. 

Final representation

For the final representation, we used the Unity tool. In order to represent the sounds on each part of the creation, we had to map the sound input on each scene.



Project Details

Client:

Saint-Gobain

Date:

November 15, 2019

Team:

Bright

Distribution :

Event

More information?

Contact us
We love what we do!

Related Projects

Do you have a question? Contact us now!

Contact Us

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Free Demo
Contact
+33 1 82 83 66 63
Français